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Announcing our 2018-2019 Season!

by Rick Alice
Auditions: July 9 & 10, 2018
Preview: September 6, 2018
Performances: September
7-9 & 14-16, 2018

Music & Lyrics by Stephen Sondheim
Book by Burt Shevelove & Larry Gilbert
Auditions: September 17, 18 & 19, 2018
Preview: November 1, 2018
Performances: November
2-4, 9-11 & 16-18, 2018

Adapted by Marisha Chamberlain
from the novel by Louisa May Alcott
Auditions: November 5 & 6, 2018
Preview: January 10, 2019
Performances: January
11-13 & 18-20, 2019


Music by Matthew Sklar
Lyrics by Chad Beguelin
Book by Chad Beguelin & Tim Herlihy

Auditions: January 21, 22 & 23, 2019
Preview: March 7, 2019
Performances: March
8-10, 15-17 & 22-24, 2019

by Aaron Sorkin
Auditions: March 11 & 12, 2019
Preview: May 2, 2019
Performances: May
3-5 & 10-12, 2019

Music by Andrew Lloyd Webber
Lyrics by Tim Rice
Auditions: May 13, 14 & 15, 2019
Preview: July 11, 2019
Performances: July
12-14, 18-21 & 25-28, 2019


Peter and the Starcatcher

Tony-winning Peter and the Starcatcher upends the century-old story of how a miserable orphan comes to be The Boy Who Would Not Grow Up (a.k.a. Peter Pan). A wildly theatrical adaptation of Dave Barry and Ridley Pearson’s best-selling novels, the play was conceived for the stage by directors, Roger Rees and Alex Timbers, and written by Rick Elice, with music by Wayne Barker. From marauding pirates and jungle tyrants to unwilling comrades and unlikely heroes, Peter and the Starcatcher playfully explores the depths of greed and despair… and the bonds of friendship, duty and love.

A young orphan and his mates are shipped off from Victorian England to a distant island ruled by the evil King Zarboff. They know nothing of the mysterious trunk in the captain’s cabin, which contains a precious, otherworldly cargo. At sea, the boys are discovered by a precocious young girl named Molly, a Starcatcher-in-training who realizes that the trunk’s precious cargo is starstuff, a celestial substance so powerful that it must never fall into the wrong hands. When the ship is taken over by pirates – led by the fearsome Black Stache, a villain determined to claim the trunk and its treasure for his own – the journey quickly becomes a thrilling adventure.

A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum

Broadway’s greatest farce is light, fast-paced, witty, irreverent and one of the funniest musicals ever written. A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum takes comedy back to its roots, combining situations from time-tested, 2000-year-old comedies of Roman playwright, Plautus, with the infectious energy of classic vaudeville.

A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum is a nonstop laughfest in which Pseudolus, a crafty slave, struggles to win the hand of a beautiful, but slow-witted, courtesan named Philia for his young master, Hero, in exchange for freedom. The plot twists and turns with cases of mistaken identity, slamming doors and a showgirl or two.

Little Women

Share this timeless and enduring classic about the March sisters’ journey from childhood to maturity during the American Civil War.  Audiences of all generations will enjoy acquainting — or reacquainting — themselves with the sisters:  Meg, the eldest; Jo, the high-spirited tomboy; Amy, the self-centered beauty; and gentle Beth, as well as their beloved Marmee and Father.  Together the March family learns to endure both good times and bad as they share the joys and pains of growing up.  In this beautifully dramatized adaptation of the classic novel, even as privation, illness, and sibling rivalry cast their shadows, each girl strives to find her true self. Interlaced with warmth, family loyalty and traditional values, all these important events provide us with a better understanding of our own lives.  Penned by Louisa May Alcott 150 years ago, this much-loved classic tale’s message is still relevant for audiences today.

The Wedding Singer

The Wedding Singer takes us back to a time when hair was big, greed was good, collars were up and a wedding singer might just be the coolest guy in the room. Based on the hit Adam Sandler movie, The Wedding Singer’s sparkling new score does for the ’80s what Hairspray did for the ’60s. Just say yes to the most romantic musical in twenty years.

It’s 1985, and rock star wannabe, Robbie Hart, is New Jersey’s favorite wedding singer. He’s the life of the party until his own fiancée leaves him at the altar. Shot through the heart, Robbie makes every wedding as disastrous as his own. Enter Julia, a winsome waitress who wins his affection. As luck would have it, Julia is about to be married to a Wall Street shark, and, unless Robbie can pull off the performance of a decade, the girl of his dreams will be gone forever.

A Few Good Men

This Broadway hit about the trial of two Marines for complicity in the death of a fellow Marine at Guantanamo Bay sizzles on stage. The Navy lawyer, a callow young man more interested in softball games than the case, expects a plea bargain and a cover-up of what really happened. Prodded by a female member of his defense team, the lawyer eventually makes a valiant effort to defend his clients and, in so doing, puts the military mentality and the Marine code of honor on trial. A Few Good Men marked Aaron Sorkin’s Broadway playwriting debut at the age of 28 for which he received the John Gassner Award as Outstanding New American Playwright.

The Addams Family

Hundreds of years ago, the Addams family ancestors came from the old country and settled on a plot of land in what is now New York’s Central Park. This was, of course, long before it was a park, when it was still wilderness. The family flourished for many generations, and eventually, a huge house was built where a great Spanish oak, the Addams Family Tree, had been planted to protect the ancestral graves from such annoyances as sunlight and tourists.

The Addams Family features an original story, and it’s every father’s nightmare. Wednesday Addams, the ultimate princess of darkness, has grown up and fallen in love with a sweet, smart young man from a respectable family – a man her parents have never met. And if that weren’t upsetting enough, Wednesday confides in her father and begs him not to tell her mother. Now, Gomez Addams must do something he’s never done before – keep a secret from his beloved wife, Morticia. Everything will change for the whole family on the fateful night they host a dinner for Wednesday’s ‘normal’ boyfriend and his parents.